Graham Williams Reviews

New from LSO Live & Tacet

MENDELSSOHN: SYMPHONY NO. 2 (LOBESGESANG), John Eliot Gardiner/ LSO Live LSO0803  Sir John Eliot Gardiner’s riveting survey of Mendelssohn’s orchestral works with the London Symphony Orchestra (the 5 Symphonies, Overtures and the Incidental Music to A Midsummer Night’s Dream) has yielded some of the most compelling releases on the LSO Live label in the past few years. It now reaches a triumphant conclusion with this magisterial account of the Symphony No. 2 (Lobesgesang) taken from two concerts at the Barbican given on 16th and 20th of October 2016. Continue reading

Opulent Schmidt & Mahler from MDG & Channel

SCHMIDT: SYMPHONY NO. 2, R. STRAUSS: FESTLICHES PRÄLUDIUM, Orchester Bonn, Stefan Blunier/MDG SACD 937 2006-6  Those with a penchant for sumptuous and grandiloquent late-Romantic orchestral works should investigate without delay this latest MDG release from Stefan Blunier and his fine Beethoven Orchester Bonn that couples the 2nd Symphony of Franz Schmidt with Richard Strauss’s imposing Festliches Präludium Op 61. Both these works received their premieres in 1913 and with this recording make their debut on SACD in high resolution sound. Continue reading

RÓZSA: BEN HUR: THE COMPLETE SCORE City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra/Nic Raine

This Miklos Rózsa two-disc set is an indispensable acquisition for admirers of the composer. Despite splendid efforts from such contemporary rivals as Dimitri Tiomkin, Rózsa’s Hungarian-influenced scores were the definitive musical incarnations of the Hollywood epic, and this celebrated  score is considered by many aficionados to be Rózsa’s best work in that vein, full-blooded and passionate. Apart from the generous playing times of these discs, the icing on the cake is the sheer panache of the orchestral playing by the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra under the ever-reliable Nic Raine, the conductor who, more than any other contemporary musician, has the full measure of these scores. The original soundtrack recording of this music left much to be desired sonically, with boxy, thin sound – nothing like as rich as this state-of-the-art modern recoding. Rózsa admirers have had their prayers answered – although the composer’s own vivid Decca recording of extracts from the score should not be parted with.

RÓZSA: BEN HUR: THE COMPLETE SCORE City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra/Nic Raine

 

Filippo Gorini: Beethoven in London

Those lucky enough to have recently attended a private concert in London near the BBC will have been privileged to hear a rare display of nonpareil pianism from the young Italian pianist Filippo Gorini. With a sensitivity, maturity and sense of poetry that belied his youth, Gorini gave a recital including the Diabelli Variations that winkled out every nuance in Beethoven’s masterpiece with an attention to detail that recalled the masterly performances of the great Alfred Brendel. And this was no surprise to have heard Gorini’s recent record of the piece on Alpha Classics, sporting a performance that rivalled the older man’s reading. Neither would it surprise those who knew that after hearing Filippo’s performance of the Variations, Alfred Brendel invited Filippo to work with him, and they have since continued to work together regularly. The Diabelli Variations feature on Filippo’s debut disc, which has garnered much acclaim, including a Diapason d’Or Award and a stellar review on The Guardian.

Upcoming performances for Gorini include concertos in Korea, Germany, China, and prestigious recitals throughout Europe, including the Elphilharmonie Hamburg, the Brussels Flagey Piano Days Festival, and the Accademia Filarmonica di Trento. He will appear also in Australia and North America in 2019. In May 2017, Filippo received the Beethoven-Ring prize from the Citizens for Beethoven Association in Bonn. His previous competition achievements include first prize at the Neuhaus Competition in Moscow, and prize of the Young Euro Classics Festival in Berlin.

His concert appearances in Europe have drawn unanimous acclaim; in particular, his tour with the Klassische Philharmonie Bonn and his debut in Warsaw at the Ludwig van Beethoven Easter Festival. He has performed on many prestigious stages such as the Konzerthaus Berlin, Leipzig Gewandhaus, Laeiszhalle Hamburg, Die Glocke Bremen, Società del Quartetto di Milano, Royal Academy of Music London, Great Hall of the Moscow Conservatory, Beethovenhaus Bonn, and Sale Apollinee at Teatro La Fenice. Alongside his solo career, Filippo continues to perform as a chamber musician: last year he performed at “Chamber Music Connects the World” in Kronberg, with Steven Isserlis.

After graduating from the Donizetti Conservatory in Bergamo, Filippo continues his studies with Alfred Brendel, Maria Grazia Bellocchio, and with Pavel Gililov at the Mozarteum University in Salzburg. He is a scholarship recipient of the Lichtenstein Music Academy.

 

Striking SACD Dvorak from Bosch on Coviello

DVORAK: SYMPHONY NO.1, Staatsphilharmonie Nurnberg, Marcus Bosch/Coviello COV 91718  Over the years, a great many of the gaps in the surround sound discography have been plugged, but there have still been some surprising omissions. In the case of the great Czech master Dvorak, for instance, eight of his nine symphonies have been available for some time in SACD format, with just one in stereo only, the Brahmsian First Symphony. But now, the under the auspices of the Staatsphilharmonie Nurnberg under Marcus Bosch, that omission has been rectified. What’s more, this is no placeholder performance, but a reading of great energy and zest – the qualities that have distinguished other discs by this conductor. Bosch is a musician unafraid to take certain unorthodox choices – his recent set of Bruckner symphonies, for instance, utilised some daringly accelerated speeds. But such was the rigour and conviction with which he employed them, many listeners were persuaded that this was a perfectly legitimate approach to a composer normally granted stately tempi. The methodology employed with Dvorak’s First here is not quite as radical, but does perform a perfectly legitimate piece of orchestral surgery on the work. As mentioned above, the symphony was composed when Dvorak was still under the spell of Brahms, and most performances have tended to stress that connection. Bosch, however, suggests the direction that the composer’s imagination was to take subsequently and renders it more of a brother (or sister) to the more colourful (in a specifically Czech sense) to the later symphonies. This approach is largely convincing and this is among the most striking performances the symphony has enjoyed. If there is a caveat, it is the fact that no room has been found for a fill-up – Neeme Järvi on his impressive Chandos reading includes the symphonic poem The Hero’s Song. Nevertheless, this is a small quibble, and Dvorak admirers should not hesitate.