VIVALDI: THE QUATTRO STAGIONI, Brecon Baroque, Rachel Podger/Channel Classics SACD CCSSA40318  For the countless admirers of the playing of Rachel Podger and her Period group Brecon Baroque this latest recording of Vivaldi’s ‘Le Quattro Stagioni’ (The Four Seasons) – the most celebrated four violin concertos drawn from his Op. 8 set of 12 violin concertos entitled ‘Il cimento dell’armonia e dell’inventione’ (The Trial of Harmony and Invention) – will be a mandatory purchase. Continue reading

New BIS, Chandos, PENTATONE

RACHMANINOV: PIANO CONCERTOS 2 & 3, Yevgeny Sudbin, BBC Symphony Orchestra, Sakari Oramo/BIS 2338SACD  From the composer himself onwards, recordings of Rachmaninov’s two most popular piano concertos (1 and 4 remaining less celebrated) have done considerable justice to these titans of the piano repertoire, and any new entry has to have a persuasive reason why it should be a contender. While Yevgeny Sudbin may not displace some of the talents of the past, this is a powerful, dramatic reading of both works, with the inestimable advantage of a typically impressive surround sound recording from BIS. Over the course of almost 10 years, Sudbin has been recording Rachmaninov’s works for piano and orchestra. The journey began in the U.S.A. in 2008 with the Fourth Piano Concerto, and what Classic FM Magazine described as ‘a glorious recording’ with the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra under Grant Llewellyn. For the Paganini Variations and Piano Concerto No. 1, Sudbin continued to Asia and highly praised collaborations with the Singapore Symphony Orchestra and conductor Lan Shui. The grand finale of Sudbin’s Rachmaninov cycle combines the two best-loved concertos – No. 2 in C minor and No. 3 in D minor. His partners in these are the BBC Symphony Orchestra and chief conductor Sakari Oramo, the perfect companions.

BIZET: LES PÊCHEURS DE PERLES, Soloists, Orchestre Nationale de Lille, Alexandre Bloch/ PENTATONE PTC 5186 685 (2 discs)  The confusion over the various versions of Bizet’s colourful (if absurd) operatic masterpiece continues to this day, but those seeking the most authentic version will find that the new PENTATONE recording amply fulfils their needs. What’s more, it’s sung with great conviction and passion, doing full justice to those sinuous vocal lines. Les Pêcheurs de Perles contains a quintessentially French blend of lyricism, exoticism and drama, and the four soloists (Julie Fuchs as Leïla, Cyrille Dubois as Nadir, Florian Sempey as Zurga and Luc Bertin-Hugault as Nourabad) belong to today’s best performers for this specialist repertoire. Their vocal excellence is matched by the choral contributions of Les Cris de Paris. The rich sound palette of Les Pêcheurs is fully brought to life by the inspired playing of the Orchestre National de Lille under the baton of its new Music Director Alexandre Bloch.

WALTON: VIOLA CONCERTO, etc. James Ehnes / BBC SO / Edward Gardner CHANDOS SACD CHSA 5210 (See also Graham Williams’ review opposite)  The Edward Gardner series of recordings for Chandos have proved consistently excellent, maintaining the company’s long commitment to this glorious British composer. The selection on this latest disc, is particularly cherishable, given that none of the works on offer have been massively over-recorded. What is certain, however, is that these are among the most striking readings the pieces have ever enjoyed on disc, even stretching back as far as George Szell. ‘With Walton’s Viola Concerto, none of the writing is impossible but a lot of it is close. And in a way that is exactly where you want it to be: on the edge of technical limitations. There’s a tremendous amount of excitement in that.’ So says James Ehnes, who switches from his violin to tackle a monument in the viola’s literature, all superbly captured in surround sound

KORNGOLD: SYMPHONIC SERENADE, OP. 39 IN B FLAT MAJOR; SEXTET, OP. 10 IN D MAJOR (ARR. FOR STRINGS BY HARTMUT ROHDE), NFM Leopoldinum Orchestra, Hartmut Rohde/CPO 555138-2  It’s not difficult to spot the key reason for buying this disc: an orchestration of Korngold’s Sextet which does full justice to the composer’s full-blooded manner (if without that final ounce of mastery that he himself might have provided). For lovers of the ripely romantic music of Erich Wolfgang Korngold, this is something of a treat. Not only is the performance of the Symphonic Serenade by Rohde and his forces more pointed than the otherwise admirable one by the BBC Philharmonic under Bamert (Chandos), we are given what is essentially a new Korngold orchestral piece: a sympathetic orchestration of the Sextet Opus 10. The arrangement for string orchestra by the conductor is perfectly attuned to the composer’s Straussian (but still highly individual) compositional character, and it’s a delightful piece — without replacing the original.

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: THE PASSIONS OF VAUGHAN WILLIAMS, Philharmonia Orchestra, Richard Hickox, Rachel Roberts, Alistair Mackie, Schola Cantorum of Oxford, James Burton/CRUXGZ001DVD   The days when Vaughan Williams’ achievement as one of the great English composers had slightly slipped out of modern favour are, thankfully, in the past. Almost every note that he composed has found (or is finding) its way onto disc. This Crux selection is a particularly enjoyable collection, performed with great affection by a variety of artists (including the late Richard Hickox) – and make for an intriguing programme.

MESSIAEN: CATALOGUE D’OISEAUX, Pierre-Laurent Aimard PENTATONE SACD PTC 5186670: Triple SACD + BONUS DVD  Classical CD Choice ran an interview with the pianist Pierre-Laurent Aimard last month about this very set, and it’s heartening to report that the discs themselves do full justice to the pianist’s vision of his teacher Messiaen’s work. The performances are full of nuance (with perhaps a slight caveat that the pianist’s vocal interjections sometimes interpose themselves over the music). The renowned French pianist inaugurates his PENTATONE commitments with Olivier Messiaen’s Catalogue d’Oiseaux. The pianist had intimate ties to the composer himself and his wife, Yvonne Loriod, for whom Messiaen wrote the Catalogue. This is Aimard’s first recording of Messiaen’s most extensive, demanding and colourful piano composition. The luxurious CD box set contains an accompanying bonus DVD, on which Aimard shares his vast knowledge of and love for Messiaen’s work from behind the piano.

BIZET: DJAMILEH – COMIC OPERA IN ONE ACT,• Jennifer Feinstein, Eric Barry, George Mosley, Poznan Chamber Choir, Poznań Philharmonic Orchestra conductor Łukasz Borowicz/DUX 1412  While PENTATONE have supplied an exemplary reading of Bizet’s more familiar opera The Pearl Fishers (see above), it’s good to see the more neglected Djamileh appearing in a fine new reading on disc. And this is a very charming take on the one-act opera with a libretto by Louis Gallet. Djamileh tells an oriental love story between the title slave Djamileh and Cairo sultan Haroun. The plot, bringing to mind the atmosphere of One Thousand and One Nights, is a quite typical example of Romantic fascinations with the East. From the very beginning it raised Bizet’s doubts, who considered it to be too difficult for a stage adaptation. However, the artistic craft of the creator of Carmen balanced the libretto’s deficiencies, surrounding the story of oriental lovers with a suggestive sound aura, achieved thanks to an original instrumentation and bold, chromatised harmonic language. The craftsmanship of Jennifer Feinstein, performing the title part, allows the listener to enjoy all values of this little known opera.

MORYTO: WORKS FOR ORCHESTRA,The Witold Lutosławski Chamber Philharmonic in Łomza, Jan Miłosz Zarzycki, DUX  For those with adventurous tastes, this could be a CD well worth their time. This DUX CD is a review of Stanisław Moryta’s latest orchestral work, an outstanding contemporary composer, organist and teacher. Born in 1947, professor Moryto can boast of an exceptionally versatile artistic publishing activity, focused on Polish organ music and rich compositional output. Listening to the recording made by members of the Chamber Philharmonic Witold Lutosławski in Łomża, under the direction of Jan Miłosz Zarzycki, the listener will encounter original elaborations of motifs from Kurpie music and then follow the extensive dialogues of solo instruments in the Concerto for percussion, harp and string orchestra. Four Pieces in Polish Style for String Orchestra, Seven Kurpie Sings for Soprano and Orchestra, Suite for String Orchestra, Concerto for Percussion

BARTOK & KODALY: CONCERTOS FOR ORCHESTRA, Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, Jakub Hrůša/PENTATONE PTC5186626  For a long time, Georg Solti’s readings of Bartok’s Concerto for Orchestra were nigh-definitive, but in the SACD years, we have been provided with new and dramatic readings. That’s the case here, although earlier readings (such as the recent Hungaroton recording by Kocsis) are not displaced. The Kodaly Concerto for Orchestra is more of a rarity, although listeners new to the piece should be aware that it is minor work by him, unlike the Bartok which is one of the composer’s key pieces. These exuberant pieces are collected in vivid performances from the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra conducted by the podium sensation Jakub Hrůša on this release.

GRIEG: PIANO CONCERTO IN A MINOR, OP. 16; SKETCHES FOR PIANO CONCERTO NO. 2 IN B MINOR – PREMIERE

FREDERICK DELIUS: PIANO CONCERTO IN C MINOR (1907), Mark Bebbington, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Jan Latham-Koenig/ Somm 269  While the well-known the first concerto of Grieg is given a strong reading here, it is the orchestrated sketches – and solo piano passages – of the composer’s unfinished second piano Concerto which is the drawing point here. In the event, rather disappointingly, it turns out to be only eight minutes or so of music, and hardly indicates what the finished work would have been had the composer completed it. Nevertheless, it is intriguing listening for those who love Grieg, and the other piece here, the Delius piano concerto, is given any very sympathetic reading.

KARAYEV: SYMPHONY NO. 1, VIOLIN CONCERTO *, Janna Gandelman, Violin *,Kiev Virtuosi Symphony Orchestra, Dmitry Yablonsky/Naxos 8.573722  While many music lovers are content to spend their listening time in the company of old favourites from Beethoven to Respighi, there are those of us who are always on the lookout for something new to tickle the ear. New, that is, in the sense that while the music may be composed sometime in the past, it has largely remained unfamiliar. Case in point? Kara Karayev was one of the most prominent figures in the music of 20th-century Azerbaijan, and an inspiration to subsequent generations of Azerbaijani composers. His eloquently expressive and tautly dramatic First Symphony is a significant work in Karayev’s output, reflecting both the harmonies and melodic characteristics of the South Caucasus region and, in its orchestral brilliance, the influence of his mentor Shostakovich. The Violin Concerto shows a notable shift in style, exploring the serial techniques that add astringency and inventive depth to Karayev’s already richly coloured and vividly diverse palette.

VIVALDI: THE QUATTRO STAGIONI, Brecon Baroque, Rachel Podger/Channel Classics SACD CCSSA40318 (See also Graham Williams’ review opposite)  Not another Four Seasons, I hear you cry? Yes – and a very welcome one, given the absolute (and very typical) commitment to the music shown by Rachel Podger and the Brecon Baroque. Earlier readings by these forces have made very persuasive cases for the various scores that they have tackled, but they have set themselves a particularly challenging task in this case, with the music so overfamiliar for most listeners that a truly fresh and energetic approach is required – precisely what The Red Priest gets here. The sheer athletic prowess of the players provides music-making that banishes all thoughts of those interminable waits on phone lines with ‘Spring’ on a perpetual loop. We can hear it afresh in this new recording, which becomes one of the definitive readings at a stroke. Together with the star players of Brecon Baroque, Rachel Podger guides us through the seasons of nature and life. The musical range is sensational and matched all the way by Jared Sacks’s luminous and emotionally engaged recorded sound.
OTHER NEW DISCS

Also worthy of attention are a brace of new discs with notable individual qualities. The Audite label has a colourful and idiomatic quartet of readings of Strauss (RICHARD STRAUSS: MACBETH, DON JUAN, TOD AND VERKLARUNG AND THE FESTMARSCH IN C) with the Staatskaplle Wein conducted by Kiril Karabits, while the Alpha imprint boasts a very competitive reading of Scandinavian works (SIBELIUS, RAUTAVAARA: VIOLIN CONCERTOS) played by the virtuoso Tobias Feldmann and the Orchestre Philharmonique conducted by the authoritative Jean-Jaques Kandorow; there are many impressive readings of the Sibelius in the catalogue, but this is a real contender. From Linn, BIBER: THE MYSTERY SONATAS is granted an emotional reading by the Boston Baroque with Christina Day Martinson and Martin Pearlman, while from Les Soloistes de L’OSM, we are given intriguing versions of the BEETHOVEN’S SEPTET and a chamber version of STRAUSS’S TILL EULENSPIEGEL on the Analekta label. Finally, impressive readings of RAVEL, FRANCK, LIGETI AND MESSIAEN: CHAMBER WORKS from the Duo Gazzana on the ECM New Series imprint; the attention to detail on this fine disc is fastidious, with highly impressive results.

CHANDOS BECOMES AN APPLE CURATOR

Following its recent move to make new releases available on Apple Music from street date, on 20 April 2018, Chandos became the latest independent classical music label to join the ranks of Apple Music Curators. Chandos’ Curator’s page has been launched with three main strands of playlists, including one dynamic playlist, expertly curated to showcase Chandos’ extensive catalogue range in its usual high sound quality. As a pioneer of the album ‘series’, Chandos will as Apple Music Curator be curating three playlist series. ‘The Sound of’, ‘Introducing’, and ‘Rediscovering’ will encapsulate what Chandos does best, bringing less
well-known composers and compositions to the forefront of classical music. Of course, music that has been loved by generation after generation will play a part in the playlists, too. ‘The Sound of’ will be a series of themed playlists based around certain moods, activities, or situations: perfect accompaniments to everyday life. Exclusive to Apple, the dynamic playlist ‘The Sound of Classical’ will take centre stage in this series, regularly updated with Chandos’ newest and most exciting recordings as well as the best of Chandos recordings from the last three decades. Other playlists within this series will include ‘The Sound of Piano’, ‘The Sound of Nature’, ‘The Sound of Relaxation’, and more. ‘The Sound of’ series will not only make it easier for regular Chandos listeners to discover new music but also easier
for Chandos to introduce classical music to budding listeners. Chandos’ ‘Introducing’ playlists will centre round Chandos’ artists to bring their recordings into the spotlight. Beginning with Chandos’ most popular artists, such as Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, the Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra, and Tasmin Little, playlists covering a range of their music will make it easier for listeners to discover, in one place, new repertoire played by their favourite musicians. The ‘Rediscovering’ series will be an exploration of Chandos’ extensive catalogue, the playlists curated
around recordings of the more neglected areas of classical music, on which Chandos prides itself. Examples of this series will be ‘Rediscovering British Composers’ and ‘Rediscovering Chaconne’, this last a playlist based around Chandos’ early music label. New playlists will be added to all three series
throughout the year, and current playlists will be regularly updated.
Whether you are already a lover of classical music or you think you could be, Chandos Apple Music Curator will have a playlist for you.
You can find the Chandos Curator profile here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/curator/chandos/1358876178

Debussy: A Painter in Sound by Stephen Walsh, Faber, £20

If you are an admirer of the greatest of all French Impressionist composers (with Ravel running him a close second), your library will probably sport several biographies of Claude Debussy. So why should Stephen Walsh’s new attempt to assess the life and achievement of the composer be worthy of your attention? The answer — quite simply – is that it is one of the most astute and sympathetic studies of the composer that you are likely to read. In fact, Walsh’s own description, ‘A biography of sorts’, suggests the particularly astute balancing act he performs between celebrating the exquisite music and the turbulent life of this difficult, temperamental man. Walsh’s study, couched in elegant prose, never falls into the simply sequential. With fresh insights into such masterpieces as La Mer as well as little-known works such as Debussy’s unfinished opera based on Poe’s ‘Fall of the House of Usher’, this becomes at a stroke a definitive guide to the life and work of a great French composer.

Barry Forshaw