Striking SACD Dvorak from Bosch on Coviello

DVORAK: SYMPHONY NO.1, Staatsphilharmonie Nurnberg, Marcus Bosch/Coviello COV 91718  Over the years, a great many of the gaps in the surround sound discography have been plugged, but there have still been some surprising omissions. In the case of the great Czech master Dvorak, for instance, eight of his nine symphonies have been available for some time in SACD format, with just one in stereo only, the Brahmsian First Symphony. But now, the under the auspices of the Staatsphilharmonie Nurnberg under Marcus Bosch, that omission has been rectified. What’s more, this is no placeholder performance, but a reading of great energy and zest – the qualities that have distinguished other discs by this conductor. Bosch is a musician unafraid to take certain unorthodox choices – his recent set of Bruckner symphonies, for instance, utilised some daringly accelerated speeds. But such was the rigour and conviction with which he employed them, many listeners were persuaded that this was a perfectly legitimate approach to a composer normally granted stately tempi. The methodology employed with Dvorak’s First here is not quite as radical, but does perform a perfectly legitimate piece of orchestral surgery on the work. As mentioned above, the symphony was composed when Dvorak was still under the spell of Brahms, and most performances have tended to stress that connection. Bosch, however, suggests the direction that the composer’s imagination was to take subsequently and renders it more of a brother (or sister) to the more colourful (in a specifically Czech sense) to the later symphonies. This approach is largely convincing and this is among the most striking performances the symphony has enjoyed. If there is a caveat, it is the fact that no room has been found for a fill-up – Neeme Järvi on his impressive Chandos reading includes the symphonic poem The Hero’s Song. Nevertheless, this is a small quibble, and Dvorak admirers should not hesitate.