Strauss & Mahler from Pentatone


  1. STRAUSS: ALSO SPRACH ZARATHUSTRA, MAHLER: TOTENFEIER, RSO Berlin, Vladimir Jurowski Pentatone PTC5186 597 SACD Those familiar with his work with the London Philharmonic Orchestra will know that Vladimir Jurowski is one of the most exciting and gifted conductors of his generation, so his new appointment as Chief Conductor and Artistic Director of the RSO Berlin is a cause for celebration. The possibility of a really outstanding performance and recording of Strauss’s ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’ in multi-channel sound from Pentatone was also an enticing prospect, but unfortunately my high expectations for this release were not met. The famous opening ‘Einleitung’ should be sonorous and immediately arresting, but here it makes little impact. The timpani sound boomy and cavernous while the Seifert organ – dubbed on from the St. Matthias Kirche, Berlin-Schöneberg – sounds unimpressive and decidedly lacking in weight in the lower frequencies. As the work proceeds Jurowski elicits some luscious string sounds from his fine orchestra and the fairly closely miked recording allows much detail in the orchestration to be heard. The fugal ‘Von der Wissenschaft’ section is especially clearly articulated by the double basses – not always the case, but again the lack of heft from the organ at the climax of this section is disappointing. ‘Das ‘Tanzlied’ benefits from the deft playing of concertmaster Rainer Walters and though at times Jurowski’s tempi seem a tad cautious, the build up to the final huge climax and the strokes of the midnight bell are impressively delivered. The concluding epilogue ‘Nachtwanderlied’ typifies Jurowski’s rather cerebral approach to this piece. ‘Also sprach Zarathustra’, though running continuously, has nine clearly defined sections, but Pentatone, in contrast to most of the available alternative versions on disc has unaccountably (and unhelpfully) allotted a single track to the whole work that lasts 32′ 53”. They did the same with their recent recording of Strauss’s ‘Ein Heldenleben’, another regrettable decision. Jurowski and his orchestra seem much more involved with their account of Mahler’s early symphonic poem ‘Totenfeier’ that the composer re-worked as the opening movement of his second symphony. Here the playing is fiercely committed and makes a good case for occasional outings of this example of Mahler’s first thoughts. “The Symphonic Prelude in C minor,” attributed here to Mahler is a student work from 1876 that sounds very like early Bruckner. There is no trace of the original score, but a preliminary sketch for it, apparently made by one of Mahler’s student friends, is preserved at the Austrian National Library. The task of orchestrating the Prelude was undertaken (at the request of Peter Ruzicka the artistic director of the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra) by Albrecht Gürsching, the Hamburg composer and musicologist and it was first performed in March1981 by this orchestra conducted by Lawrence Foster. Subsequent research, however, has thrown doubt as to whether this piece is actually by Mahler and Henri de La Grange, a leading authority on the composer, has wisely expressed the view that: “Until such time as new evidence comes to light, it seems extremely unwise to ascribe this piece to Mahler”. The current general consensus seems to be that if not by Bruckner himself it is probably by one of the Bruckner adherents among Mahler’s fellow students. This short brooding piece is, to be honest, pretty unremarkable, but Jurowski’s expansive performance does it more justice than that heard on Neeme Järvi’s 1992 account for Chandos. Pentatone’s DSD recording is to the usual high house standard and, while perhaps not their finest, does not disappoint.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *