New from Challenge, Hyperion & Capriccio

GRIEG: Piano Concerto; INCIDENTAL MUSIC TO ‘PEER GYNT’, Jean-Efflam Bavouzet / Bergen Philharmonic Orchestra / Edward Gardner/Chandos SACD CHSA 5190  For admirers of the composer Grieg, there is an argument for having his complete incidental music to Ibsen’s Peer Gynt – but it is to be hoped that this consideration will not steer them away from the very generous selection included here (much more than in the familiar suites). Chandos and Gardner give us virtually all the important music that Grieg composed for the play. The score is given an extremely winning and characterful performance by Edward Gardner, who has rapidly established himself as one of the most important conductors to record regularly for the Chandos label. What’s more, this Peer Gynt is accompanied by a particularly distinctive performance of the composer’s other signature work, the warhorse that is  the Piano Concerto, and the wonderfully blooming surround sound recording does full justice to both works These keenly idiomatic performances of the most famous works by Grieg are superbly captured in exemplary Chandos surround sound.

TIPPETT: SYMPHONIES ONE & TWO, BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Martyn Brabbins/Hyperion CDA 68203  Admirers may wonders if Michael Tippett’s operas will ever come back into fashion – their pursuit of the then-‘hip’ and fashionable rendered them instantly dated even as they appeared. For all their virtues, works such as The Ice Break are a salutary reminder that timelessness rather than trendiness is a more apposite choice for musical longevity. Such considerations, however, hardly apply to the composer’s superbly crafted symphonies which are here given fresh and vital new readings by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra under Martyn Brabbins in a recording that does full justice to the quirky and unusual nature of the composer’s orchestration. In the famous rivalry between Tippett and his contemporary Britten (the tenor Robert Tear told me that there was little love lost between the two men), it is the music of Britten that has the greater hold on the repertory. These highly impressive performance may help put Tippett’s symphonies back on the musical map.

MARTINŮ: Early Orchestral Works, Volume Three: Vanishing Midnight; Ballade (after Böcklin’s picture Villa by the Sea); Dream of the Past, Sinfonia Varsovia, Ian Hobson/Toccata TOCC 0414   Those not signed up to an admiration society of the composer Martinů may be prepared to concede that his symphonies (and such pieces as the Double Concerto) are unquestionably top drawer, but some dismiss much of his other music as efficient note-spinning. Those naysayers will no doubt apply such strictures to the collection on this record, but admirers of Martinů will be grateful that these three under-regarded pieces have been committed to disc in performances brimming with affection. Ballade (after Böcklin’s picture Villa by the Sea) is a particular pleasure here, and it is interesting to see a piece inspired by the painter which is something other than his celebrated Isle of the Dead, which memorably inspired Rachmaninov’s tone poem.

WEINBERG: Violin Concerto; KABALEVSKY: Piano Fantasy; Cello Concerto No. 1, Benjamin Schmid, Claire Huangci, Harriet Krijgh, ORF Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, Cornelius Meister/Capriccio B077BQGBT1  There is a provocative mix of Soviet composers on this expertly played disc – two musicians who underwent very different experiences under the oppressive Stalin regime that ruined the lives of so many of their peers. Kabalevsky, more adroit at passing through the requisite hoops, escaped largely unscathed, but Weinberg (not least for his Jewishness in a notably anti-Semitic era) had his wings clipped – which makes his an astonishingly prodigious output under these circumstances all the more impressive. Listening to the various pieces on this disc makes it clear that Weinberg is the more accomplished of the two composers, although both wrote music full of invention and character. The more substantial work, Weinberg’s Violin Concerto, is given an extremely authoritative reading here.

SHOSTAKOVICH: Violin Sonata, 24 Preludes (arr. violin and piano), Sergei Dogadin, Violin, Nikolai Tokarev, Piano/Naxos C5310  If one were to attempt any ‘innocent ear’ test with the transcription of Shostakovich’s piano Preludes to be found on this disc, the listener might consider that these pieces were written for precisely the forces utilised here, i.e. violin and piano. And while this new version does not unseat the composer’s original thoughts, it makes for a fascinating alternative to the piano-only original. Dmitri Shostakovich’s succinctly composed and highly distinctive 24 Preludes have proved their popularity in numerous arrangements, but when the composer heard these transcriptions by Dmitry Tsyganov he declared that ‘I forgot they were originally written for piano, so naturally did they sound.’ The set was completed in 2000 by the Russian-born composer and pianist Lera Auerbach. These often whimsical and ironic Preludes contrast greatly with the chilling and profound Violin Sonata, a late work that concludes with Shostakovich’s last ever use of passacaglia form.

VAUGHAN WILLIAMS: SONGS OF TRAVEL, etc., James Gilchrist / Philip Dukes / Anna Tilbrook/Chandos 10969   Vaughan Williams’ Songs of Travel have been particularly lucky on disc, both in its voice-and-piano version and in the later orchestral transcription. It is the former which is given an airing here, and while James Gilchrist’s adroit performance does not unseat some distinctive readings of the past, Gilchrist is nevertheless able to find all the nuances in both Robert Louis Stevenson’s text and Vaughan Williams’ impeccable rendering of the same. In fact RVW admirers may be attracted by the disc’s fill-ups, which consist of several other pieces by the composer in effective performances. Having championed British repertoire together for the past twenty years, Anna Tilbrook and James Gilchrist are joined by Philip Dukes in a lyrical journey through some of Vaughan Williams’s best songs and rarely heard chamber music.

R. STRAUSS: DER ROSENKAVALIER, Camilla Nylund, Peter Rose, Paula Murrihy, Netherlands Philharmonic orchestra Mark Albrecht Challenge Classics SACD While the great Rosenkavalier readings of the past (notably Solti and Karajan) are not unseated by this new contender, it is still a strong and characterful addition (in vivid surround sound) to the long list of recordings of Strauss’s glorious opera. The three principal soloists (while variable) find many of the nuances of the character sometimes elided in otherwise top drawer performances. And the sense of stage drama is pointed up at various important junctures. Hardly a definitive reading, but which performance of the Rosenkavalier is?

RAAFF: Violin Concerto/Symphony No.1, Tasmin Little, Radio Filharmonisch Orkest conductor Jaap van Zweeden/Etcetera Records KTC1593   Do you consider yourself an adventurous classical music aficionado? If so, here is a disc which is well worth your time – particularly given the fact that the violinist Tasmin Little applies her considerable skills to this unfamiliar music and makes the best possible case for it. De Raaff is of the generation of Dutch composers who emerged in the nineties. In 1999 De Raaff had the special privilege of being invited to work as George Benjamin’s only composition student at the Royal College of Music in London where he also studied with Julian Anderson. The very word concerto naturally calls up automatic associations with the Classic and Romantic musical traditions. If, however, there is one composition that does not fit this classical template, it is de Raaff’s Violin Concerto. Tasmin Little’s performances are non-pareil.

BRITISH CONCERTANTE ,Various orchestras, Gavin Sutherland, Barry Wordsworth/Heritage Records HTGCD191  For many years, British light music was held in relatively low regard, despite the fact that even the slightest investigation of the field discloses music of real invention and charm, taking it well beyond the ‘easy listening’ category. And here is a collection to make that point. British Concertante features orchestral music written for soloist and accompaniment composed by leading figures in the Light Music movement: Angela Morley (equally creative as when Morley was known as Wally Stott), Bryan Kelly, Francis Chagrin, Philip Spratley and David Lyon.

COPLAND: ORCHESTRAL WORKS, VOL. 3, BBC Philharmonic / John Wilson/Chandos SACD CHSA 5195  There are those (including this this listener ) who would prefer Copland’s original thoughts and prefer his ‘Organ’ Symphony, which has a heft and a dramatic power somewhat reduced in the composer’s later transcription to standard forces recorded here. What’s more, John Wilson has already given us an impressive performance of the former piece. Nevertheless, if your taste is for the orchestral version alone, you are unlikely to find it performed with more dedication and musicianship than here. An invigorating programme of orchestral works by Copland, the third volume in John Wilson’s already widely praised exploration, featuring in particular the First Symphony and the lively Outdoor Overture. (See also Graham Williams’ review opposite)

Forthcoming from PENTATONE

On the horizon from PENTATONE are new recordings of Mendelssohn’s Fourth and Fifth symphonies by Andrew Manze, along with an intriguing disc of Hindemith orchestral music from Marek Janowski. Both, it can be anticipated, will shine in the company’s splendid SACD surround sound.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *